Five-year Capital Improvement Program

Planning infrastructure for the future


Your Town looks ahead to our future. Each year as part of the budget process, Town Council adopts a list of construction projects in the five-year Capital Improvement Program. In fact, this planning is so important, it’s required by Town Charter. 

The first year in the five-year plan aligns with the current budget, in this case, 2017. The remaining portion of the document is a planning tool that shows the current state of thinking, yet depends on future funding. The current plan focuses on Council priorities, including transportation, long-term water and public safety. 

Here is a summary of the largest projects in the plan. 


Transportation projects related to growth


Third and Perry streets intersection 


The Festival Park redesign will require the closure of Second Street, which will mean an increase in traffic at the Third and Perry Street intersection in Downtown Castle Rock. To accommodate that increase in 2017, the Town will change this intersection from a two-way stop to a roundabout. This project is anticipated to not only help reduce traffic congestion at the intersection, but also to help calm travel speeds in the Downtown area.

Cost: $1 million
Funding source: Building Use Tax
Design and construction: 2017

Ridge Road widening


The Town will widen Ridge Road between Colorado Highway 86 (Fifth Street) and Plum Creek Parkway. The objective of this project is to improve congestion relief due to current and forecasted traffic volumes. 

Cost: $400,000
Funding Sources: Impact Fees and Building Use Tax
Design: 2017
Construction: 2018 


Improvements at Founders Parkway and Allen Way 


To improve operations at Founders Parkway and Allen Way, the Town is allocating resources to design a new intersection and acquire right-of-way from the Colorado Department of Transportation. These improvements will include additional turn lanes and a second lane on the northbound on-ramp to Interstate 25. This project will help alleviate congestion at this intersection and accommodate additional traffic volumes as the Town grows.

Cost: $360,000 for design and right-of-way acquisition in 2017 
Funding sources: Building Use Tax and Federal Grant Funds 

Transportation maintenance projects


Just as it is important to build improvements, it’s important to maintain what we already have. 

Meadows Parkway reconstruction


The Town will reconstruct the concrete pavement along Meadows Parkway between Prairie Hawk Drive and U.S. Highway 85. The opening of Castle Rock Parkway in 2016 allows for an alternate route while this significant work is completed, minimizing disruption to the traveling public. 

The Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) has notified the Town that the application for federal funding has been approved and that 80 percent of project costs will be covered by a federal pass-through grant.

Cost: $1.98 million
Funding sources: Road and Bridge Tax and Federal Grant (80 percent)
Construction: 2017

Securing renewable water


Castle Rock Water will continue to focus its efforts on securing renewable water for our future. Here is a look at two of the larger construction projects that will help move the Town toward that goal in the next five years. 

Future pipelines and pump stations:

 
In 2015, the Town secured storage space in Parker’s Rueter-Hess Reservoir. Now, it’s time to move water to the reservoir. In 2017, the Town will study ways to move South Platte water supplies from the foothills to the new reservoir. Another study will evaluate how to move water from the Plum Creek Water Reclamation Authority to Rueter-Hess through existing infrastructure, which will be upgraded in 2017. 
Likely, partnerships with area water providers will be necessary to make construction of this project feasible. Once feasibility of all project components is determined, funds will be budgeted in the future for design and construction of the project. 

The Town owns substantial Denver Basin groundwater supplies and a limited amount of surface water on Plum Creek. However, as the demand for water increases along with the Town population, other supplies will need to be secured to meet that demand. Sustainable water supplies must be imported to the Town, with a focus on proximity and feasibility.

Cost: $5.7 million
Funding sources: System Development Fees and Water Resource Fees

Chatfield reallocation project: 


The Town also owns storage space in Chatfield Reservoir. This project will fund the participation and maintenance costs of the Town's reserved storage space (200 acre-feet). The Town plans to increase its participation rate to 2,000 acre-feet over a 15 to 20 year period. This project has been identified as a critical component of the Town's Renewable Water Plan, which includes maximizing the Town's existing supplies and finding the most efficient solutions to meet the Town's long- term renewable water supply goals. 

Cost: $1.2 million 
Funding sources: System Development Fees and Water Resource Fees

Public safety initiatives


Crystal Valley Ranch fire station: 


As the population in the southern end of Town grows, Castle Rock Fire and Rescue will need a new fire station to maintain levels of service and response time. It will be located in Crystal Valley Rancy and provide service to Castle Rock’s southernmost neighborhoods, including Crystal Valley Ranch, the Lanterns, Heckendorf Ranch, Stone Canyon Ranch, Sellars Creek Ranch, Bell Mountain Ranch, a large portion of Plum Creek, and the South Lake Gulch Road corridor areas. The station will house a fire engine and a brush truck, specifically designed for wildland firefighting, and will necessitate the hiring of 12 personnel.

Cost: $4.8 million for construction and equipment
Funding sources: Impact Fees and Sales Tax
Construction: 2017
Operation: 2018

More information


Read the full Capital Improvement Plan